Brecksville OH

Superfoods That Can Improve Your Memory

While many superfood compounds are made available in pill form as nutritional supplements, they are most readily absorbed and utilized by your body in their natural form, as foods.

Dr. Susan Taylor Mayne, professor at Yale University, told the Scientific American, “A major problem with supplements is that they deliver nutrients out of context. The vitamins found in fruits, vegetables and other foods come with thousands of other phytochemicals, or plant nutrients that are not essential for life but may protect against… Alzheimer’s disease and other chronic ailments.”

Memory Boosting Superfoods That Fight Alzheimer’s” an Alzheimers.net article, discusses the best superfoods for the brain, which you can find at any supermarket.

So next time you go shopping, treat yourself to some of the delicious, nutritious brain-healthy foods below:

Leafy Greens and Other Vegetables

Vegetables, particularly leafy green vegetables, have been shown to have protective effects on the brain according to research published in the Journal of Food Science and Technology. Research shows that not just leafy greens are beneficial, but vegetable intake in general, is beneficial for your health.

A study in the Journal of Nutritional Health and Aging states clearly: “Increased intake of vegetables is associated with a lower risk of dementia and slower rates of cognitive decline in old age.”

One important note: seniors who take blood thinners should avoid greens like kale which is high in vitamin K, as this can potentially cause dangerous drug interactions.

Fish, Flax Seeds and Nuts

According to research published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, omega-3 fatty acids, which are commonly found in some fish, grains and nuts, can potentially help to slow the rate of decline in Alzheimer’s.

Similar findings were reported in the European Journal of Nutrition. Both studies acknowledge further research is necessary and the Alzheimer’s Association adds, “there is not yet sufficient evidence to recommend any omega-3 fatty acids to treat Alzheimer’s disease.”

Because foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids are naturally some of the healthiest foods there are, they are beneficial to whole-body health even if the scientific community hasn’t confirmed that they can actually slow Alzheimer’s.

Chocolate, Coffee and Spices

Chocolate and coffee contain caffeine, which studies have shown can improve brain function and memory.

A study in the International Journal of Molecular Scienceindicated that caffeine may “slow Alzheimer’s disease pathology” through inhibiting a neurotransmitter believed to be associated with Alzheimer’s, acetylcholinesterase. A study published in Molecular Medicine Reports seemed to confirm potential benefits, finding that daily caffeine intake is associated with “significantly increased memory capability,” and may “reverse memory impairment.”

Spices like cinnamon, nutmeg and turmeric are also rich in their own unique compounds and may have multiple cognitive benefits. The journal Central Nervous Systems Agents in Medicinal Chemistry says, “the neuroprotective effects of spices have been demonstrated and, whether directly or indirectly, such beneficial effects may also contribute to an improvement in cognitive function.” Spices contain so many compounds that they have multiple potential beneficial modes of action, including “anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hypertensive and gluco-regulatory.”

Dark Skinned Fruits with Antioxidants

Scientists have also been exploring the benefits of antioxidants and there is some evidence that dietary antioxidants may improve cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia.

For example, one study reported on in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that an antioxidant may be able to reduce plaques in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s. Foods high in antioxidants include: berries like raspberries, strawberries, oranges and other dark skinned fruits.

Healthy Oils Like Coconut Oil and Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Coconut oil is being investigated for its Alzheimer’s fighting effects. One study, found in the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, even investigated the possibility of using coconut oil to replace an approved medicine used to treat Alzheimer’s (caprylidene).

While further research is required, there is strong anecdotal evidence for the benefits of coconut oil for dementia. Dr. Mary T. Newport’s book, “Alzheimer’s Disease: What if There Was a Cure?,“ strongly argues that coconut coconut oil may help people with Alzheimer’s.

Olive oil also contains the above mentioned compounds, polyphenols. The particular phenols unique to olive oil may be particularly neuroprotective according to a study published in Nutritional Neuroscience.

 Article from "APlaceForMom.com"

5 Common Questions Adult Children Have About Senior Living

While each family’s situation is unique, many people have the same concerns.

Here are a few of the questions I often hear from families who are just beginning this complex journey:

1. How do I know when it’s time to think about senior care?

If you have any doubts about a particular behavior or you see something that feels like a red flag, it’s a good time to reach out for professional help. Even seemingly small things such as urinary tract infections can cause confusion and memory issues. If your loved one is showing behavior or personality changes or if they seem to be covering up memory issues, then a visit to their physician is warranted. Other telling clues including staying in bed, not wanting to get dressed and evidence of recent falls like bruises or cuts.

2. How do I broach the topic of senior care with my loved one?

Having the conversation about senior care can be difficult for everyone involved.

Seniors are afraid of losing their independence; of being abandoned or feeling as if they are a non-functioning member of society. Many of them picture senior living as an institutional setting where they will end up spending all day in a wheelchair watching television.

This is not what assisted living or independent senior living is about. Once seniors and their families tour communities they are often delighted by the activities, dining and individual apartments. Today’s senior living communities allow residents to come and go as they please, drive their own cars (as long as they are licensed drivers) and live their own lives.

Many adult children become frustrated when their loved ones or parents refuse to accept help or don’t understand that they need help. They may think they are managing just fine without it. A lack of awareness of impairment is common in stroke survivors or people who are suffering from dementia. It can be challenging to reason with people who have some cognitive impairment or with people who are very negative or unwilling to compromise in any way.

3. How do I deal with the guilt?

If they have talked about senior living at all, many adult children have promised their parents that they will care for them or that they will never “put them away.” You may feel guilty when you realize you can no longer care for your parents because of their advanced dementia, physical disabilities or other circumstances. You may even feel like moving them to senior living means you are breaking your promise to them. But, ultimately, by bringing them to a place this equipped to handle their needs and by bringing them to a social space, you are ultimately providing them with exactly what they need- even if they don't know it yet. 

4. What is senior living really like?

Senior living communities offer seniors that chance to stay active, to enjoy relationships and remain independent in a safe and stimulating environment. Renaissance provides restaurant-style dining so residents and their guests feel like they are going out to eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner. They are blown away by the quality of the food and the choices offered.

Every community’s goal is to have as active a community as possible. Renaissance includes a cafe, movie theater, parlors, and much more. There are also art classes, exercise classes, book clubs, and yoga classes offered to residents. Transportation is provided for trips to local attractions, events and restaurants.

The only way to know is to visit a senior living community. Chances are you’ll be surprised.

5. How long does it take someone to settle into senior living?

We find that within a month or so of moving to a community most seniors are having so much fun they don’t want to leave! Between the new friends, activities, fantastic staff, and great food, it makes it easy for them to adjust to their new fun surroundings!

Are There Benefits To Moving To An Assisted Living Facility Early?

When choosing a retirement community for yourself or your loved one, there are a lot of factors to consider. Ensuring current health needs are met is important, but will the retirement community be able to meet your future health needs as well?

Learn more information about continuing care and senior care options for seniors, and also about the benefits of moving into assisted living early.

Benefits of Moving Into Assisted Living

As seniors age, their health needs grow and become more complicated. That is why it’s always been important to choose a retirement or senior community that has a continuum of care in place.

According to the NCBI, the “continuum of care is a concept involving an integrated system of care that guides and tracks patients over time through a comprehensive array of health services spanning all levels of intensity of care.”

Historically, seniors were seeking continuing care retirement communities (CCRC), and paying a premium for them to ensure that when they moved into an independent living community they would be guaranteed a future spot should they need to make a move to assisted living later on. With this older CCRC system, seniors were financially locked in because they paid an upfront fee to guarantee their stay and their ability to get that back when they moved was reduced with time.

Some seniors, then, question whether or not it is more affordable to move to an assisted living community from the start, bypassing independent living altogether.

How Assisted Living Communities Provide More Choice and Freedom to Seniors

Most areas across the United States have a variety of retirement communities to choose from and these communities offer a continuum of care, ensuring their health services are designed to meet seniors needs. Renaissance is one of these places in your community! The days of long waiting lists are gone, giving seniors greater flexibility and choice.

Now, seniors can enter an independent living community that meets their needs in terms of amenities, price and location without worrying about whether they will find a spot in an assisted living community should they need one. They can cross that bridge when they come to it.

Increase in Homecare Services within Assisted Living

According to Willis, another change in the industry that has resulted in greater flexibility for seniors is the increase in home care services within independent care communities. “Anyone can bring in in-home care and it is your right to do that as your needs change.” Willis says.

For seniors who have made strong relationships with the staff and other residents at their independent living communities, in-home care allows them to stay in their community as long as possible, remaining connected to their support system. In fact, these relationships contribute to a senior’s emotional well-being and can often help delay the need to move to an assisted living community.

In short, it doesn’t make sense to move into an assisted living community until your health needs require that extra level of assistance.

Instead, seniors should look for a community that meets their present emotional, physical and social needs. With this flexibility, a senior’s continuum of care is more adequately addressed.